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Posts with the tag hyperflexion

The Longevity of the Dressage Horse

In the beginning of my journey into Dressage, there was confident talk about the longevity of the Dressage horse. It was generally accepted that the Dressage horse wasn’t expected to reach Grand Prix until they were nearly in their teens, and perfectly acceptable to be working towards it even after they’d hit teenage years. The […]

Dressage Knockout – As Terrible As It Sounds

As if the overwhelming persistence of bad dressage wasn’t enough, now there’s Dressage Knockout. Picture this: instead of the traditional “bore-you-to-tears” Dressage we’re used to seeing you get the pleasure of watching two Dressage riders compete against each other in the same arena. No scripted tests, No scores, 5-6 “flashy” movements, Winner is announced immediately, Audience […]

Loving Horse Sport – Interview with EponaTV

“My father was a harness racing jockey and he went into horse breeding and training. I know for a fact that he wasn’t always above board, and he’s the reason why it means nothing to me when I’m told some person’s been in the business for fifty years and therefore they can’t be doing it wrong. I grew up around very successful people who made a lot of money and I know that’s no guarantee of admirable ethics.”

3 Reasons I’m Jealous of Riders Like Anky van Grunsven

Since Sjef and Anky, Rollkur has woven its way down the levels of Dressage and crept past the discipline to find common ground with reining. And in all the time we’ve watched the Rollkur/hyperflexion/LDR debate unfold I’ve been writing about how detrimental it is. With that being said, I’M NOW READY TO ADMIT THAT I WAS WRONG. All my criticisms were actually evidence of my jealousy and it’s time I come clean.

Edward Gal Uses Rollkur – Updated

My neck gets sore just watching. It is only during a poorly developed (read spoiled) walk that Edward Gal allows any freedom of the neck to his horse, and during the rest of the ride he keeps him round, round, round. Keep in mind that not only FEI rules but also Classical Dressage Masters have noted that the position of the horse’s face should be anywhere between 45 and 90 degrees depending on the horse’s individual conformation, this horse is well beyond 90 degrees.

The Difference Between Classical and Competitive Dressage

Once upon a time ago, the difference between Classical and Competitive Dressage seemed synonymous with the distance between the walls of the Grand Canyon (which happens to be up to 18 miles wide!). Whether it is merely my perception, or the reality, which has changed I have yet to determine. Nonetheless there is still a measure of awe inspired in people when they hear that “so and so” does Classical Dressage. It has a note of magic attached to it, even if it is a tradition based on a bunch of dead guys; or maybe it is because of those dead guys.